Blog Archives

Valkia the Bloody by Sarah Cawkwell (Book Review)

Soon after having The Gildar Rift published in late 2011, Sarah had a second novel published a few months later. This time she tackled Warhammer Fantasy, with a character that I’ve since come to love. Valkia is easily the match of other great female characters of other big franchises, and her origin story is quite a compelling one. Its a shame that there haven’t been more stories with Valkia told since, in the longer format that is, because she has the potential to be a really great character in the Warhammer Fantasy setting.

This review is a repost of the original review on The Founding Fields, which can be found here.

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Hot Blooded by Amanda Carlson (Book Review)

Largely because of how good Full Blooded was, the sequel Hot Blooded had an easy time of making it to my “Most Anticipated Books of 2013” list. Reading Full Blooded made me want to take more of an interest in mainstream urban fantasy, and on that front the sequel to Amanda Carlson’s debut delivered quite nicely. Jessica McClain was awesome all the way through, and while there were some faltering steps in here, it was still a great read, and I’d definitley recommend the series.

This review is a repost of the original review on The Founding Fields, which can be found here.

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Full Blooded by Amanda Carlson (Book Review)

Full Blooded wasn’t my first urban fantasy read of 2012, not by a long shot, but it was definitely one of the most fun such books I read in that year. So much so that I made it a point to read more urban fantasy novels in 2013 (and 2014!), including some of the more… traditional types of urban fantasies that have become mainstream in the last decade or so. Full Blooded was a downright surprise, I can tell you that, and it also made me a fan of Amanda Carlson’s work, which has been quite satisfying an experience on all levels.

This review is a repost of the original review on The Founding Fields, which can be found here.

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Obsidian and Blood by Aliette de Bodard (Book Review)

Before I started reading Angry Robot novels back in 2012, I hadn’t heard of Aliette de Bodard. And then in June of that year I read her Aztec mysteries trilogy Obsidian & Blood back-to-back in a single week. The trilogy was my first proper taste of non-Anglophone fantasy, and he experience was both surreal and amazing. I loved the books of course, and the short stories that were collected in the omnibus edition. Obsidian & Blood is one of a very, very small handful of trilogies that I’ve rated as high as I have, and the entire omnibus made my list of the best books I read in 2012.

This review is a repost of the original review on The Founding Fields, which can be found here.

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Wake of The Bloody Angel by Alex Bledsoe (Book Review)

As I’ve said elsewhere before, 2012 was the big year for me, when I branched out into all sorts of different genres and subgenres. One of these was nautical fantasy and even then a more low-brow kind of nautical fantasy at that. Wake of the Bloody Angel was my first book by Alex Bledsoe and one of the very few books that I’ve finished in a day. Considering the length of it, that is certainly an achievement for me and also sort of a testament to how good the novel is. The Eddie LaCrosse books are very much stand-alone in nature, and if you want to read a slightly different kind of fantasy than the usual then Wake of the Bloody Angel is a good place to start.

In light of The Founding Fields currently suffering some major site issues recently, I’m going to be reposting my reviews from the site to the blog, so enjoy away!

The original review can be found here.

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The Key to Creation by Kevin J. Anderson (Book Review)

After reading the massive first two Terra Incognita novels back to back, I was almost burned out, but I went on with The Key To Creation, the third novel, nonetheless. I wanted to complete the experience while the events of the first two novels were still largely fresh in my mind, while I still could recall all the intricate connections that Kevin was setting up and exploring. And thankfully, The Key To Creation delivered on most of my expectations, and ended up being the best of the trilogy by a decent margin.

In light of The Founding Fields currently suffering some major site issues, I’m going to be reposting my reviews from the site to the blog, so enjoy away!

The original review can be found here.

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The Map of All Things by Kevin J. Anderson (Book Review)

Once I got started on my reading of the Terra Incognita novels, I didn’t stop, I just plowed straight on, finishing the trilogy in about a week I think, or maybe an extra day or two at most. The experience was an intense one and I definitely immersed myself in the tales of dogmatic religious crusades, tragedies, adventures on the high seas and doomed romances. In many ways The Map of All Things was a better novel than its predecessor, The Edge of The World, and I loved that the series got better as it went on.

In light of The Founding Fields currently suffering some major site issues, I’m going to be reposting my reviews from the site to the blog, so enjoy away!

The original review can be found here.

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The Edge of The World by Kevin J. Anderson (Book Review)

Back in 2012 I was offered a chance to review a copy of Kevin J. Anderson’s third and final Terra Incognita novel, The Key To Creation, as part of a massive reviews-promotion event by the David Gemmell Legend Awards organizers. As I hadn’t read the previous books, and this was one of only two books on the list that piqued my interest, I accepted with the self-imposed caveat of going back to read the previous books. Daunting challenge that, because these novels are massive in true Kevin J. Anderson fashion. Fortunately, the experience was positive enough, and here we are now.

In light of The Founding Fields currently suffering some major site issues, I’m going to be reposting my reviews from the site to the blog, so enjoy away!

The original review can be found here.

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Legends of Dune by Kevin J. Anderson and Brian Herbert (Book Review)

Frank Herbert’s Dune is for me one of the best space opera stories told, ever. It has had a great influence on me, as both a reader and a writer, and it really opened up the world of grand space opera for me, a world of rich, detailed settings and fantastic characters. Since Frank Herbert’s death, his son Brian and noted SFF author Kevin J. Anderson have taken up the master’s mantle and they’ve delivered a number of novels in the Dune-verse, continuing the original Dune Chronicles series and also going back to flesh out tons of prequel stories hinted at in the original series.

Legends of Dune is one such trilogy, which focuses on the fabled years of the Butlerian Jihad. The trilogy goes into detail about how the Jihad started and how it ended, presenting some truly great moments. If you are a fan of Dune and Dune Chronicles, then Legends of Dune is well worth a read for sure.

In light of The Founding Fields currently suffering some major site issues, I’m going to be reposting my reviews from the site to the blog, so enjoy away!

The original review can be found here.

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Hammer of Angels by G. T. Almasi (Book Review)

G.T. Almasi’s debut to his smash-read Blades of Winter arrived in February 2014, but thanks to reviewer privileges I got to read the novel much earlier, in December 2012 itself. I didn’t like the sequel as much as I’d liked the debut, but it proved to be a good enough read in the end and I loved getting back with the protagonist Alix Nico on her globe-trotting adventures.

In light of The Founding Fields currently suffering some major site issues, I’m going to be reposting my reviews from the site to the blog, so enjoy away!

The original review can be found here.

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Blades of Winter by G. T. Almasi (Book Review)

G. T. Almasi debuted in late summer 2012 with his debut novel Blades of Winter, the first in the Shadowstorm series. It was a novel that captivated me from the get go, being a very modern James Bond-style action-thriller that also reminded me that I loved the action-espionage-drama-thriller genre mash-up.

In light of The Founding Fields currently suffering some major site issues, I’m going to be reposting my reviews from the site to the blog, so enjoy away!

The original review can be found here.

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The Horns of Ruin by Tim Akers (Book Review)

Back in 2012, Tim Akers’ The Horns of Ruin was my first distinct steampunk novel. And I liked it quite a bit. It gave me a taste of the genre and made me want to read more in it. I haven’t really gotten around to that unfortunately, reading only a novel here and there at random, but now that I’m reminded of what I’ve been missing all this long. I’ve read a couple novels recently, and they’ve only cemented my growing love for steampunk fiction.

In light of The Founding Fields currently suffering some major site issues, I’m going to be reposting my reviews from the site to the blog, so enjoy away!

The original review can be found here.

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