Blog Archives

The Painted Man by Peter V. Brett (Book Review)

Peter Brett’s Demon Cycle series is another series that I wanted to read when I got back into reading in late 2011, given that his name often came up alongside those of author (very) popular authors on a lit of “best of” lists. I eventually got to read the first novel last year, as part of my “25 Series To Read In 2013” reading challenge, and the experience was… illuminating. As with many of the other highly popular books I’ve read in the last three years, I didn’t come away as impressed as I’d hoped/expected to, but The Painted Man was still a good read, enough that I wanted to carry on with the sequel, though I never got the chance to.

This review is a repost of the original review on The Founding Fields, which can be found here.

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The Woken Gods by Gwenda Bond (Book Review)

Angry Robot launched its Young Adult imprint Strange Chemistry in Fall 2012 and in the year and a half since, the new imprint has published a lot of great fiction, such as the Emilie novels by Martha Wells or The Holders novels by Julianna Scott. Some of it hasn’t been to my tastes however, and thus I didn’t enjoy them. One of these is Gwenda Bond’s second novel for the publisher, The Woken Gods. This is kind of a post-apocalytpic urban fantasy (though not quite extreme on the first half of that description), and it was certainly interesting, but in the end I didn’t come out with as good an opinion of it as I’d hoped.

This review is a repost of the original review on The Founding Fields, which can be found here.

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Obsidian and Blood by Aliette de Bodard (Book Review)

Before I started reading Angry Robot novels back in 2012, I hadn’t heard of Aliette de Bodard. And then in June of that year I read her Aztec mysteries trilogy Obsidian & Blood back-to-back in a single week. The trilogy was my first proper taste of non-Anglophone fantasy, and he experience was both surreal and amazing. I loved the books of course, and the short stories that were collected in the omnibus edition. Obsidian & Blood is one of a very, very small handful of trilogies that I’ve rated as high as I have, and the entire omnibus made my list of the best books I read in 2012.

This review is a repost of the original review on The Founding Fields, which can be found here.

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Gotrek & Felix: City of The Damned by David Guymer (Book Review)

The Gotrek & Felix novels by both William King and Nathan Long are among the very first Warhammer Fantasy novels I bought back in 2005/2006 when I was getting back into Black Library reading with the Warhammer 40,000 setting. I was already a huge fan of Bill’s Space Wolf series, and making the transition to the fantasy side of things with both Gotrek and Felix was rather easy as it turned out. Even Nathan’s own work was great once I started reading it. But then, eventually, Nathan moved on to other things as Bill had before him, and the tale of the Trollslayer and his rememberer passed into the hands of another new generation of writers.

Of these new writers, David Guymer is one of only two writers who have been asked to continue on the adventures of Gotrek Gurnisson and Felix Jaeger. I’ve read both of Josh Reynolds’ novels, Road of Skulls and The Serpent Queen and loved them both. With David however, the transition has not been easy, though I liked the audio drama he did with them last year. City of The Damned is a continuity-free novel like both of Josh’s novels, but it also is set up as a prequel to the more recent release, Kinslayer which is the first part of the Doom of Gotrek storyline and is the penultimate novel in the final ending of Gotrek’s saga. I read it earlier this month and I have somewhat mixed feelings about it.

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He Drank, And Saw The Spider by Alex Bledsoe by Alex Bledsoe (Book Review)

Following on after reading Wake of The Bloody Angel in 2012, I wanted to read the other Eddie LaCrosse novels soon after but as with many other such endeavours, nothing happened, and I didn’t read one until late last year, when the new novel came out. He Drank, And Saw The Spider is a much different novel to Wake of The Bloody Angel, with an entirely different supporting cast for Eddie and a different setting as well, but it was no less fun than the previous novel. And once again, I got swept along for a great adventure.

In light of The Founding Fields currently suffering some major site issues recently, I’m going to be reposting my reviews from the site to the blog, so enjoy away!

The original review can be found here.

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Wake of The Bloody Angel by Alex Bledsoe (Book Review)

As I’ve said elsewhere before, 2012 was the big year for me, when I branched out into all sorts of different genres and subgenres. One of these was nautical fantasy and even then a more low-brow kind of nautical fantasy at that. Wake of the Bloody Angel was my first book by Alex Bledsoe and one of the very few books that I’ve finished in a day. Considering the length of it, that is certainly an achievement for me and also sort of a testament to how good the novel is. The Eddie LaCrosse books are very much stand-alone in nature, and if you want to read a slightly different kind of fantasy than the usual then Wake of the Bloody Angel is a good place to start.

In light of The Founding Fields currently suffering some major site issues recently, I’m going to be reposting my reviews from the site to the blog, so enjoy away!

The original review can be found here.

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The Winds of Khalakovo by Bradley P. Beaulieu (Book Review)

Bradley P. Beaulieu’s Lays of Anuskaya trilogy went on my “25 Series To Read In 2013” largely because of my Twitter interactions with the author at the time and because of the positive buzz I saw about his books as I made more and more friends in the reviews-sphere. Russian fantasy? Sure. Give me more. It was a very unique experience in most regards and the entire Russian bent to the story and setting definitely was one of the biggest reasons why I loved the first two books in the series.

In light of The Founding Fields currently suffering some major site issues recently, I’m going to be reposting my reviews from the site to the blog, so enjoy away!

The original review can be found here.

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All The Windwracked Stars by Elizabeth Bear (Audio Review)

Elizabeth Bear is an author I’ve wanted to read for the longest time, alongside a long line of other authors. When I began my “25 Series To Read In 2013″ reading challenge last year, I put one of her earliest series on the list because I wanted to kind of see how she got started since I also wanted to eventually progress to her other more recent novels. It didn’t quite work out like that and I only managed to get through All The Windwracked Stars by also listening to the audiobook of the novel. It was a fun, decent experience that was must different from the usual sort of fantasy I read, so I can definitely recommend it.

In light of The Founding Fields currently suffering some major site issues recently, I’m going to be reposting my reviews from the site to the blog, so enjoy away!

The original review can be found here.

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Fortune’s Pawn by Rachel Bach (Book Review)

As you have seen recently from my reposted reviews, Rachel Aaron is one of my favourite fantasy authors, for a whole load of different reasons. When I heard in late 2012 that Rachel was going to be publishing a new series with Orbit Books, a space opera trilogy no less, I got very excited. All the expectations that I had of the Paradox series were fulfilled when I got done reading the first novel last year, Fortune’s Pawn, and then the sequel and the third novels earlier this year. If you are looking for a space opera that is both serious and humorous at the same time with a great female protagonist, then Fortune’s Pawn has to be on your radar!

The Paradox novels are published by Orbit as written by Rachel Bach, rather than Rachel Aaron.

In light of The Founding Fields currently suffering some major site issues, I’m going to be reposting my reviews from the site to the blog, so enjoy away!

The original review can be found here.

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Debris by Jo Anderton (Book Review)

2012  was the year when I really got back into reading on a regular consistent basis, and I started the year off by reading some great novels from Angry Robot. Throughout the year, I read a number of the publisher’s titles, old and new alike, and one of these was award-winning author Jo Anderton’s Debris, the first in her Veiled Worlds series. Coincidentally, Jo’s award was for Debris itself and when I got done reading it, I could definitely see why it did, because it truly is a fantastic read with a rather unique take on things. Recommended reading!

In light of The Founding Fields currently suffering some major site issues, I’m going to be reposting my reviews from the site to the blog, so enjoy away!

The original review can be found here.

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The Key to Creation by Kevin J. Anderson (Book Review)

After reading the massive first two Terra Incognita novels back to back, I was almost burned out, but I went on with The Key To Creation, the third novel, nonetheless. I wanted to complete the experience while the events of the first two novels were still largely fresh in my mind, while I still could recall all the intricate connections that Kevin was setting up and exploring. And thankfully, The Key To Creation delivered on most of my expectations, and ended up being the best of the trilogy by a decent margin.

In light of The Founding Fields currently suffering some major site issues, I’m going to be reposting my reviews from the site to the blog, so enjoy away!

The original review can be found here.

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The Map of All Things by Kevin J. Anderson (Book Review)

Once I got started on my reading of the Terra Incognita novels, I didn’t stop, I just plowed straight on, finishing the trilogy in about a week I think, or maybe an extra day or two at most. The experience was an intense one and I definitely immersed myself in the tales of dogmatic religious crusades, tragedies, adventures on the high seas and doomed romances. In many ways The Map of All Things was a better novel than its predecessor, The Edge of The World, and I loved that the series got better as it went on.

In light of The Founding Fields currently suffering some major site issues, I’m going to be reposting my reviews from the site to the blog, so enjoy away!

The original review can be found here.

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