Blog Archives

All The Windwracked Stars by Elizabeth Bear (Audio Review)

Elizabeth Bear is an author I’ve wanted to read for the longest time, alongside a long line of other authors. When I began my “25 Series To Read In 2013″ reading challenge last year, I put one of her earliest series on the list because I wanted to kind of see how she got started since I also wanted to eventually progress to her other more recent novels. It didn’t quite work out like that and I only managed to get through All The Windwracked Stars by also listening to the audiobook of the novel. It was a fun, decent experience that was must different from the usual sort of fantasy I read, so I can definitely recommend it.

In light of The Founding Fields currently suffering some major site issues recently, I’m going to be reposting my reviews from the site to the blog, so enjoy away!

The original review can be found here.

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The Death of Antagonis by David Annandale (Book Review)

David Annandale debuted on the Black Library back in early 2012 and since then he has turned out one quality work after another, whether that be for novels or novellas or even audio dramas. He has written in all the different formats that Black Library publishes, and I would even say that he has emerged as one of its strongest writers in the novella format. Last year his Black Dragons novel The Death of Antagonis was released and it proved to be a great read indeed. The Black Dragons are one of the most colourful of all the Space Marine Chapters, being a part of the fabled Cursed Founding, and to see them get some spotlight is great indeed.

In light of The Founding Fields currently suffering some major site issues, I’m going to be reposting my reviews from the site to the blog, so enjoy away!

The original review can be found here.

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Horus Heresy: Know No Fear by Dan Abnett (Book Review)

Black Library’s Horus Heresy series is a worldwide bestseller, and with good reason. Many of the novels and anthologies and audio dramas have ranged from good to stellar with very few bad apples in between. The series started off innocuously enough, but it has since then become the publisher’s flagship range, also with good reason. One of the first books in the series to come out, right alongside the excellent Deliverance Lost from Gav Thorpe, was Dan Abnett’s Know No Fear, a novel that proved to be a major game changer in the series, both in terms of the lore revealed and also for future novels. It is also one of the best novels in the series, by far.

In light of The Founding Fields currently suffering some major site issues, I’m going to be reposting my reviews from the site to the blog, so enjoy away!

The original review can be found here.

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Born To Us by Dan Abnett (Short Story Review)

Black Library started its trend of micro-shorts back in 2012 and it is something that has really caught on since. With a word-length ranging from 1,000-2,000 words, these shorts are great teasers for various characters and events within Warhammer 40,000 and Warhammer Fantasy Battles. Dan Abnett kicked off the 2012 Black Library Advent Calendar with his Inquisition short story Born To Us, which I loved since it satisfied my desire to read more Eisenhorn, a character I love dearly.

In light of The Founding Fields currently suffering some major site issues, I’m going to be reposting my reviews from the site to the blog, so enjoy away!

The original review can be found here.

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Pariah by Dan Abnett (Book Review)

Coming in at the end of 2012, Dan Abnett’s Pariah was one of my most anticipated reads of the year. The start of a new Inquisition trilogy, dubbed Eisenhorn vs Ravenor, the novel promised much in its premise, which is why I was so excited for it. But unfortunately the reality didn’t pan out, not at all. Now, Pariah has the unfortunate distinction of one of the worst novels from Black Library I’ve read to date. It just didn’t work for me, not on any level, and I was sorely disappointed with it. As it turned out, my review also turned out to be one of the most contentious I’ve ever written and my opinion on it seems to be among a very, very small minority of the fans.

In light of The Founding Fields currently suffering some major site issues, I’m going to be reposting my reviews from the site to the blog, so read on!

The original review can be found here.

Note: This review contains major spoilers.

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Thorn and Talon by Dan Abnett (Audio Review)

Among the very first Black Library audios that I listened to was Dan Abnett’s masterpiece Thorn and Talon. Containing three audios set across the timeline of Dan’s Eisenhorn and Ravenor trilogies, it was a pretty damn good audio, one that set a very high bar for others that followed. Even now, almost three years after it was first published, it still remains as one of Black Library’s finest audios, due in no small part to the excellent voice-acting. The audio made my “Best of 2012 Part 1” list as well so it is highly recommended!

In light of The Founding Fields currently suffering some major site issues, I’m going to be reposting my reviews from the site to the blog, so enjoy away!

The original review can be found here.

Read the rest of this entry

The Eternal Crusader by Guy Haley (Novella Review)

I started reading Guy Haley’s novels back in 2012 and I quickly became a fan. His Richards and Klein Investigations duology has a bit of a rough start but it really gets better as it goes on and since then he has done quite a fair bit of work for Black Library’s Warhammer 40,000 and Warhammer Fantasy settings, as well as two original novels for Solaris Books. He has been quite prolific undoubtedly, and I have to say that his particular style of SF really appeals to me. It is descriptive and technical, veering almost into the Hard SF subgenre, and him bringing something like that to Warhammer 40,000 is just amazing.

Last year Guy published three novels with Black Library, but I got the chance to read only one of them unfortunately. Right now I’m in the middle of catching up to a lot of the Black Library stuff that I have missed in the last year and a half, and when I found that Guy had written a Black Templars novella, I got really excited. More when I saw that it was about the Third War For Armageddon. The Eternal Crusader tells the tale of how newly-christened High Marshal Helbrecht of the Black Templars arrives at Armageddon and how he carries out his duty towards the Imperium in the arena of siege warfare. It is one of my new favourite novellas from Black Library, and in a nutshell, Guy totally captures the nature of the Black Templars and Helbrecht’s place in the grand scheme of things.

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Future’s End: Green Lantern and Phantom Stranger (Comics Review)

As usual for DC by now, September is the publisher’s big month of doing one-shots. In 2012 it was the origin issues #0 for all the titles. In 2013 it was Villain’s Month as the top-selling titles all got villainous one-shots. In 2014 it is Future’s End as all the titles step 5 years forwards in time to Future’s End and show how Earth 1 has changed in the fallout of the war with Earth 2 and what has happened to all the different heroes. Last night I read the Grayson and Green Arrow one-shots and they were excellent, so this morning I decided to step up that reading and get through a lot more.

It has been almost a year now since I haven’t read the flagship Green Lantern series. Robert Venditti stepping in for Geoff Johns was a really rough transition for me and I gave up after Green Lantern #23. And then comes along the Future’s End: Green Lantern #1 one-shot and suddenly I feel as if I’ve been missing out. This is a far better one-shot than I’d expected, both in terms of the writing and the artwork. On the other hand, Phantom Stranger is a title I’ve been following now for well over a year and writer J. M. DeMatteis hasn’t really disappointed to date. And this one-shot is definitely among his absolute best stories to date. It also helps that Phil Winslade does a great job with the art and really makes this an issue worth reading.

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Censure and Honour To The Dead (Audio Review)

I’ve remarked before how strong Black Library’s audio range is for its flagship Horus Heresy series. The successes have been many, the not-successes very, very few. And that’s just the way I like it. Both Big Finish and Heavy Entertainment have done a great job with the voice-actors they’ve brought to the various stories, penned by some of the publisher’s finest writers, and the audios are one way that I can get a regular quick fix of Horus Heresy without hunkering down in a novel or an anthology. And gotta admit, listening to some of these high-action audios while in a gym has its own rewards too!

Last year the publisher debuted two brand-new audio dramas that used Dan Abnett’s near-excellent Know No Fear as a starting point. In that novel, the tale of the Word Bearers’ betrayal of the Ultramarines in the the Veridian system unfolded, and it was a turning point in the Horus Heresy, as important as the Dropsite Massacre at Istvaan V. While Nick Kyme’s audio Censure is set in the years after the betrayal at Calth (the primary world in the Veridian system) as the Underworld War for control of the world rages on, Gav Thorpe’s Honour To The Dead is set in the early moments of the betrayal. The former focuses on a key individual from Know No Fear and the latter on a battle between two Titan legions. Both are strong audios in almost all respects, and I would certainly recommend both.

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Catechism of Hate and Spear of Macragge (Novella Review)

The Ultramarines are the premier Space Marine Chapter in Warhammer 40,000. Over the years, they have been built up as a Chapter that other Chapters aspire to be like, for they are the best example of everything a Chapter should be and could be. Sometimes that has been executed well, sometimes not, and often times the fandom has portrayed them as far too… vanilla, too boring because of their straightforward nature, whether in the lore or in the tabletop gaming rules. And designers and writers have often tried to change that around as well, to mixed success.

In 2012, if I recall correctly, Black Library launched its first Space Marine Battles novella, Catechism of Hate, which focused on one of the Ultramarines’ defining hero, Master of Sanctity Ortan Cassius, and the story focused on one of his missions against the Tyranids. And then late last year we had Spear of Macragge, which continued the story of the Second Company and its efforts to defeat the Necron legions on the world of Damnos as told in the Nick Kyme’s novel Fall of Damnos. Having just recently finished reading both novellas, I can say that they are both fantastic,and well worth the time spent reading them. They portray very different attitudes to war among the Ultramarines, and cover a broad range of characters, mixing some really great stories with really good execution.

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The Tranzia Rebellion Eps 1-2 by C. Z. Dunn (Audio Review)

Black Library has had a fairly strong audio range for several years, thanks in part to the excellent work done on the Horus Heresy audios. Two years back the publisher began releasing short 8-10minute audios as well, in addition to its longer range, and they too proved fairly successful. First with Big Finish and then with Heavy Entertainment, several characters and stories have been brought to audio life by the publisher, whether we talk Warhammer 40,000 or Warhammer Fantasy Battles, and it has been a truly great experience, with very few missteps along the way.

Joining the publisher’s ever-growing audio catalog is this month’s The Tranzia Rebellion radio play. Where this is now audio format differs from the usual audio dramas and audiobooks is that there is absolutely zero narration. Everything is with the characters with no narrative commentary or some such. The first two episodes, penned by C Z Dunn (formerly editor at Black Library and now working for the parent company Games Workshop) and produced by Heavy Entertainment, are really good. They are scene-setting installments of course, but still they quickly establish the characters and the story, with the voice-acting being diverse and enjoyable.

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Comics Picks For 20.08.2014

Thankfully, I’m finally settling back into the groove with comics reading and, most importantly, comics reviewing, as I managed to review a fair bit of titles this week and even caught up with reviewing some previous titles that I’ve unfortunately had to neglect for one reason or another.

The surprise hits of this week were Cartoon Network: Super Secret Crisis War: Billy and Mandy #1 from IDW Publishing, Wolverine Annual #1 from Marvel Comics and Vampirella #3 from Marvel Comics. The surprise flop of the week would be Batman: Eternal #20 from DC where the title seems headed downwards just when it was getting once again, and The Wicked + The Divine #3 from Image where the title took a nosedive this week after a second issue that was really good. No graphic novels again sadly, though I hope to correct that that this week. I hope..

Anyway, here’s another edition of “Comics Picks For…”. Full reading list, as always, is available here and all my comics reviews are available here.

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