Original Sin #6 (Comics Review)

Moving into the final phase of Original Sin, which just one more month to go before it all wraps-up, things are finally beginning to heat up for all the characters involved here. After all the startling revelations of the last two issues, everyone is in an uncertain place and I’m really loving how Jason Aaron has developed the story and how Mike Deodato and his art team have handled the artwork. The last few issues have been really good, and the title is certainly becoming one of my favourite reads of the year, and as an event comic it is certainly superb.

After the flashback-heavy content of the previous issue, Original Sin #6 moves full-steam ahead with the current story as heroes recruited by Nick Fury confront him aboard his secret satellite space station, even as the Avengers and the other heroes race against the clock to find out what the hell is going on with the “dead” Nick Fury’s body that they have and with the Watcher Uatu’s murder. Jason Aaron is absolutely superb in this issue and Mike Deodato and team don’t hold back either, making this the best issue of this series to date.

Before we get into the content side of things, I just want to point out that the cover by Julian Totino Tedesco doesn’t really reflect the inner story, not by a long shot, and I’m thinking that somewhere someone has jumped the gun on it, so to speak. I mean, I love the covers, love all of Julian’s covers for this series, but this one doesn’t match the content, and that always irritates me.

Anyway, to the story at hand. Last time we saw that Nick Fury was in fact a much older character than anyone else knew and that he had stood as a silent guard against many a cosmic threat to Earth, the first and last line of defense that no one ever saw or was aware of. A lot of the mysteries of the previous issues finally began to make sense but the core question remained: WHO killed the Watcher? This issue doesn’t give any answers on that front, though the implication is now strong that Dr. Midas (the The Thing look-alike who can turn whatever he touches into gold) and his daughter Oubliette are behind it all along with the crazy maniac The Orb who set in motion a rather disastrous series of events back in the third issue. Jason Aaron presents a very compelling and strong cliffhanger ending in the final pages of the issue and by the time you get to it, you really feel rewarded.

Things are kicking up a notch, as I mentioned, and Jason Aaron’s pacing is ramping up to match that, which is nice. His characterisation is pretty spot-on in this issue and we really get to see a ton of heroes here as Jason Aaron takes a stroll through the three major storylines going on.

What I really loved here was getting to see more of Dr. Midas and Oubliette, who have been absent for a while. Where exactly there arc is headed is unclear still, but I’m getting the feeling that even now Jason Aaron is building up to something spectacular and I totally want to be along the ride, you can be sure of that. Throughout this series, Jason hasn’t really disappointed, and I don’t see him stopping any time soon. This being his biggest piece of work as yet for Marvel, unless I’m mistaken, he has really delivered again and again, and the ending of this issue is proof of that.

With Mike Deodato’s pencils, Frank Martin’s colours, and VC’s Chris Eliopoulos’ letters, this issue is yet another example of some great artwork in a piece that focuses on as many characters as this issue does. The art is gorgeously detailed and Deodato’s pencils and inks really shine through once Martin’s colourwork makes a pass on it all. The whole dark and shadow feel of the series is very much evident and is just another way in which everything is subtly hinted at, as has been the case all along thus far.

Superb installment as far as I am concerned.

Rating: 9.5/10

More Original Sin#0, #1, #2, #3, #3.1, #4, #5, #5.1,

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Posted on July 17, 2014, in Comics Reviews, Review Central and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 6 Comments.

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