Death of Wolverine: Weapon X Program #4-5 (Comics Review)

Following on the heels of the landmark Death of Wolverine mini-series, Marvel Comics and writer Charles Soule dived straight into its major spin-off, The Weapon X Program, which takes a look at what happens with Abraham Cornelius’ various experiments at Paradise facility in the wake of Wolverine’s death. Released out in the wilds without any explanation or context, the five experimental survivors of Paradise have to discover their real identities and what was done to them. There’s also some internal dissension between all of them, and that’s what really kicks things up a notch here.

In The Weapon X Program #4 and #5 some really major things happen. First of all, we learn just who is talking to Sharp in his mind and it is a major surprise. At least, it was for me. And then, we learn more and more about what was done to these characters, and why exactly they are important to the people who funded Abraham Cornelius for his latest project, the objective of which was to create something much, much deadlier than Logan himself. With a really great story and some pretty decent art, I think this series definitely ends on a fine note.

Last time I talked about just who these people are, what their identities really are. Well, it turns out that they are not as “important” in the long-game as I believed. But, on their own, they are all still very valuable to the wrong people who would use them for their own ends. And when we learn the identity of the voice talking to Sharp and guiding his actions, and giving him visions of the past, that’s when things really kick into a high gear and get really interesting.

The best part of these two issues is definitely the character relationships. Given all the time we’ve spent with them, we are much more comfortable with them now, and it seems that some of the characters feel the same way. They relate to each other much better now, or most of them do at any rate. Given that they all started out as strangers with a healthy distrust of each other and that Neuro is pretty much a lying scumbag, that’s all a pretty big jump forward for all of them, and it is nice to see these disparate characters come together in the face of mutual interests.

Of course, given that the fifth issue in particular is also the final issue of this series, you do kind of expect the story to end with more than just what is happening with these guys, and that’s where the Life After Logan mini-series came in. Though, if you ask me, Marvel completely botched up the release on that one, and the first and seventh issues of that should have come out after the fifth issue of Weapon X Program since that’s the actual chronological flow of the larger story and the out–of-sync nature of Life After Logan really threw me off the series.

But either way, I think that Charles Soule does a good job of moving the post-Death of Wolverine Marvel-616 forward, and the fifth issues ends on a rather good note, with the characters finally taking their lives in their own hands and deciding to change things around for the better as far as they themselves are concerned. Pretty exciting stuff by all accounts.

Angel Unzueta is the penciller on the fourth issue with Marc Deering and Juan Vlasco on the inks, Frank D’Armata on colours, and VC’s Cory Petit on the letters. Angel does the art on the fifth issue as well, though with Iban Coello this time, with Drew Geraci inking the first 12 pages, Frank on colours and Cory on the letters. As with the previous issues, the art is pretty decent here and the scenes with the “new” Sharp in the fifth issue definitely stand out as something much more awesome than it seems. Slight differences in the art from the previous issues also means that the overall look has improved, and I’m all for improvements.

Well, this series has ended now and another, Wolverines, has begun, and it is definitely an exciting time.

Rating: 9/10

More Weapon X Program: #1, #2, #3.

More Death of Wolverine: #1, #2, #3, #4; (Deadpool & Captain America) #1, (Life After Logan) #1.

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Posted on January 12, 2015, in Comics Reviews, Review Central and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

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