Blog Archives

Wonder Woman (Movie Review)

Ask any comics fan who is the most iconic female superhero and the majority answer is likely to be Wonder Woman. Created by William Moulton Marston and Harry G. Peter in 1941, she has emerged as one of the most dominant of all female superheroes. Sure, you have the Storms and Jean Greys and Supergirls and Batgirls and Black Widow and others, but none come close to the pedigree of Diana, Princess of Themiscyra and Daughter of Hippolyta. Following the success of Man of Steel and Batman vs Superman: Dawn of Justice we finally have the character’s first live-action movie, Wonder Woman, that goes back to her origins and transposes the character into the war-torn era of the First World War and shows how a young girl made of clay become a legend and a myth.

Note: Some spoilers from the movie discussed in the review.

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Comics Picks For 21.01.2015

Another week of a “Magic 40”, though no graphic novels.

This week’s surprise hits were Ivar, Timewalker #1 from Valiant, Mortal Kombat X #4 from DC, and Twilight Zone: Shadow And Substance #1 from Dynamite. The disappointments of the week were Spider-Woman #3 from Dynamite and Spider-Verse #2 and The Amazing Spider-Man #13 from Marvel and Vampirella: Feary Tales #4 from Dynamite. Ongoing greats were Wonder Woman ’77 #3 , The Flash: Season Zero #11 and Supergirl #38 from DC, Black Widow #14 and Bucky Barnes: The Winter Soldier #4 from Marvel, and, Grimm Fairy Tales: Realm War #6 from Zenescope among others.

Anyway, here’s another edition of “Comics Picks For…”. Full reading list, as always, is available here and all my comics reviews are available here.

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Fast-Shot Comics Reviews 21.01.2015

I skipped another FSCR last week, largely because I kind of felt… tired about the whole thing and just wasn’t in the mood I suppose. But, to make up, I’m definitely back in it for this week!

The picks for this week are: Ivar, Timewalker #1, Scarlet Spiders #3, Spider-Woman #3, Wonder Woman #38, Samurai Jack #16 and Star Trek/Planet Of The Apes #2.

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Comics Picks For 17.12.2014

I was hoping for a second Magic 40 week in a row, but turns out that it was just wishful thinking. Still, I managed to get up to 30 comics this week, though no graphic novels sadly.

There was only one surprise hit this week, Eternal #1 from Boom Studios, as pretty much all the other comics I read this past week were ongoing series I’ve been following for a while. The disappointments of the week were Spider-Woman #2 from Marvel and Future’s End #33 from DC. And the ones that continued a great trend were the likes of Black Widow #13, Justice League #37, Catwoman #37, Supergirl #37, Wayward #5 and others.

Anyway, here’s another edition of “Comics Picks For…”. Full reading list, as always, is available here and all my comics reviews are available here.

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Wonder Woman #37 (Comics Review)

Last month DC’s Wonder Woman title underwent its first major creative change, with a completely new incoming creative team of Meredith Finch, David Finch, Richard Friend, Sonia Oback and Dezi Sienty. The outgoing creative team, headlined by writer Brian Azzarello and Cliff Chiang, had enjoyed a long and successful run, but now it was time for change, and the change when it happened, proved to be a rather disappointing one. With a major shift in characterization and art, Wonder Woman #36 was a poor experience since there was little to recommend itself.

The issue had some major problems with it and they don’t seem to have gone away with this past week’s Wonder Woman #37. While I gave up on the previous creative team almost two years ago, I am still pretty confused by the entirely dark turn that the meta-story has taken, with the Amazons acting like entitled people who couldn’t care less about the outside world, and who want to pressure Diana to take care of Themiscyra before anything else. Not to mention the fact that Hippolyta is now assuredly dead in a rather pointless sequence, and there are some dark elements on the Amazons’ island home that seem to have some rather dark designs on its people.

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Immortals: Born To Lose

Immortals. One movie that I’d really been looking forward to in the November of 2011. I’m a huge fan of Greek mythology, and I really wanted to see what this movie would be like, especially after the terrible dreariness of that-which-shall-not-be-named-but-shall-nonetheless, Clash of The Titans. I suppose I should have known better. I shouldn’t have put so much in Hollywood where stories like this are concerned.

But I did, and I paid for that… naivete. Immortals shall live on as one of the worst movies of this century. It took a brilliant concept, and then totally messed it up, on several different levels. It was at least as disappointing a movie as Clash of the Titans, if not more. Here’s my (reposted) review where I go into a bit more detail.

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Organization, Doctrines, Disposition

Organization and Doctrine

The Sons of Corax have modified the teachings of the Codex Astartes to suit their own needs and to fit their role as a fleet-based crusading chapter. Company captains are referred to as Commanders as they have responsibility not only for the battle-brothers of their company but also have flag command of a particular ship and its attendant escorts of the chapter fleet. The chapter also maintains a large number of Thunderhawk gunships, Caestus assault rams and drop pods. With all the resources at their disposal, each company Commander is able to act autonomously for long periods when needed. Consequently, the fleet-companies of the chapter rarely come together as one, unless it is by the writ of the High Commander for a major campaign.

As one of the oldest chapters, the Sons are able to field sufficient quantities of the rarest arms, armour and vehicles meant for Astartes. All veterans are able to go to war in the revered suits of Terminator armour and several rare and advanced Land Raider variants like the Achilles, Prometheus and Ares. The Sons also maintain more Dreadnoughts than many other chapters combined, evidence of their close relationship to the Adeptus Mechanicus. Consequently, the Sons’ Techmarines are some of the most experienced and skilled of their calling.

The Sons of Corax trace their origins to the Primarch of the XIXth Legion and they remain dedicated and committed to his teachings. They place great emphasis on infiltration missions and swift lightning strikes. Scouts are used to identify enemy locations and harass the enemy troops. Terminators and Veterans then deep strike via teleport homers and locator beacons planted by the Scouts while other troops engage the main enemy strength and move into position. The Sons rely on fast moving troops like Assault marines and battle-brothers on bikes and Land Speeders almost as much as other Chapters rely on their Tactical marines. Devastators and Tactical marines are afterwards deployed via Thunderhawk or Drop-pod after which the Thunderhawks are used in a support role to achieve air superiority as soon as possible. However, with their assault-dependent tactics, the Sons field few Devastator squads.

The officers of the Chapter prefer to use lightning claws as their chosen armament and the Chapter possesses several sets of these weapons, thanks to their forge-ship, the Raven Song. The Chapter Master bears the Claws of Corax, a pair of master-crafted lightning claws forged in the time of Corax by Master-Magos Bachbergens of the Mechanicus for the Primarch himself. The Claws were instead bestowed by the Primarch to the Raven Guard First Captain and then later gifted to the first High Commander of the Sons of Corax by the Raven Guard Chapter Master at the time.

Company Disposition

The Sons of Corax maintain a fighting strength of nine companies instead of the Codex-approved ten. These nine fleet-companies, as they are sometimes known, also do not fall into the typical categorization of Veteran, Battle, Reserve or Scout companies.

The First Company contains the highest concentration of the Chapter’s Veterans, six entire squads, as well as two full squads of the most experienced Scouts. The Company’s Scouts are often deployed as a vanguard force that allows the Terminator squads to strike with precision at the heart of the enemy’s force.

The Second through Fifth Battle-Companies are completely autonomous and self-sustaining forces in their own right. Each of these mainline Companies is able to field two combat squads of Veterans, six squads of Tactical Marines, three squads of Assault marines and two squads of Devastators and Scouts alike at full operational strength.

The Sixth through Ninth Companies are not just Reserve Companies but are nearly as powerful as a Codex Battle-Company. The Sixth and Seventh Companies can field five squads of Tactical marines, two and half squads of Assault marines and a squad and half of Devastators. While the Eighth and Ninth Companies are organized along the same lines, the Eighth replaces its Devastators with Assault Marines and the Ninth replaces its Assault Marines with Devastators.